are you worried about a child? find out who to talk to.
 
 

If you are not familiar with Quality Improvement and/or permanence, we recommend you watch these two webinars first. In PACE and Permanence, Linda Davidson, Permanence Consultant at CELCIS discusses why finding safe, secure and stable homes for children is so important. In PACE and Quality Improvement, Kirsty Doull, Acting Permanence Lead and Permanence Consultant at CELCIS, talks us through the key points of Quality Improvement and how it was used in the PACE programme.

line

PACE: the first steps

This section is an opportunity for people interested in the PACE programme to familiarise themselves with why PACE came about, how it was set up, and hear about some of the key things learned along the way, which may help inform future change programmes.

In addition to an overview of the PACE programme with Carol Wassell, Permanence Programme and Permanence and Care Team Lead at CELCIS from 2012 – 2020, viewers will also find webinars that provide a detailed analysis of the four national PACE aims, including the key change ideas that led to improvements in permanence planning.

line

The PACE programme: an overview

shutterstock_1319345660 pace aim 1.jpg

Watch the video

What is PACE, how did it come about, who was involved and what did we learn from delivering the programme? In this webinar, Kirsty Doull, Acting Permanence Lead and Permanence Consultant at CELCIS, is joined by Carol Wassell, Permanence and Care Team Lead at CELCIS from 2012 – 2020. Together, they look back at the PACE programme from start to finish, and reflect on what the team learned along the way.

line

How the national PACE Aims developed

In the early stages of PACE, each local authority area developed one or two aims and worked on these for the duration of the programme. However, as PACE progressed, the CELCIS team realised that it would be more beneficial to have aims that covered all parts of the permanence planning process and all ‘looked after children’ under child protection legislation, as well as having aims that all local authority areas involved in PACE worked on to give a degree of consistency across Scotland. As a result, the four national PACE Aims were developed.

Whilst the PACE Aims have suggested timescales (which are in line with statutory timescales and Scottish Government guidance), these timescales were then amended in each local authority area to reflect how their local systems were operating, having been informed by their local baseline data. In this way, all local authority areas involved in PACE were working towards national aims that had been adapted to reflect their individual circumstances.

PACE: Aim 1

shutterstock_1319345660 pace aim 1.jpg

Watch the video

The PACE programme focused on all children, regardless of where they lived, including children who were ‘looked after’ at home on a Compulsory Supervision Order (CSO). Scottish Government guidance states that a child should not usually remain on a CSO for more than two years. Aim 1 focused on children who had been on a CSO for two years or more, and introduced a further review of their plan to determine if such compulsory measures were still necessary. In this webinar, Jimmy Paul, Permanence Consultant at CELCIS, discusses the importance of Aim 1 and its impact on children and families.

PACE: Aim 3

shutterstock_1319345660 pace aim 1.jpg

Watch the video

Scottish Government guidance states that the Agency Decision Maker in a local authority should agree a child’s permanence plan within 14 weeks of a permanence recommendation being made. This was the main focus of Aim 3 of the PACE programme, which looked at this part of the process, including the assessments and reports that are required in order to scrutinise a child’s permanence plan. In this webinar, Linda Davidson, Permanence Consultant at CELCIS, discusses the importance of Aim 3 and its impact on children and families.

PACE: Aim 2

shutterstock_1319345660 pace aim 1.jpg

Watch the video

Scottish Government guidance states that there should be clarity for the direction of a child’s plan within six months of them being ‘accommodated’ i.e. living away from their parent’s care. This was the main focus of Aim 2 of the PACE programme, which looked at making a permanence recommendation about where a child should live (including a permanence return home) within these six months. In this webinar, Jimmy Paul, Permanence Consultant at CELCIS, discusses the importance of Aim 2 and its impact on children and families.

 

PACE: Aim 4

shutterstock_1319345660 pace aim 1.jpg

Watch the video

Once a child’s permanence plan has been approved by the Agency Decision Maker, the next step is to provide legal security for a child in what will hopefully be their permanent home. This was the main focus for Aim 4 of the PACE programme, which looked at the process after an Agency Decision Maker’s decision up until an application for a legal order has been lodged in court. In this webinar, Jimmy Paul, Permanence Consultant at CELCIS, discusses the importance of Aim 4 and its impact on children and families.

line

Additional resources and further reading

line

View the 'Using Quality Improvement' recorded webinars

Return to the PACE homepage

View the 'Permanence in practice' recorded webinars

Contact us

University of Strathclyde, Curran Building, Level 6
94 Cathedral St, Glasgow G4 0LG
0141 444 8500
celcis@strath.ac.uk

Sitemap | Accessibility | CookiesPrivacy notice

© 2019 CELCIS. All rights reserved.  

This website uses cookies to help improve your online experience.

By using this website you consent to the use of cookies and agree to the terms of our Cookie policyLearn more about how we use information in our Privacy notice.