CELCIS Blog

Our blog is a hub for perspectives and analysis of issues that matter to the lives of children, young people and their families. You will hear from our staff and guest bloggers on many topical issues where they will be reflecting and sharing their policy, practice and research insights..

Got a burning issue you would like to blog about? Then we would love to hear from you. Contact our communications team.

Read on and join in the chat...

The views expressed in the posts on this blog are those of the author/s and may not represent the views or opinions of CELCIS or our funders. 

Michelle McCue blogs about the 2015 SIRCC conference and its focus on how residential child care is changing.
Vicki Welch blogs on the good and bad of integrating services.
Attend, encourage and enjoy to learn - a blog by Graham Connelly
Jennifer Davidson blogs about her mission to change the world for the better.
Leaving care too early. Kenny McGhee blogs on the problems facing care leavers in Scotland.
In this blog Liz Brabender discusses how CELCIS tackles drift and delay in permanency.
A blog by Linda O'Neill discussing what children had to say in the recent Rees Centre report
Ainsley Hainey blogs about the success of the Massive Open Online Course on Caring for Vulnerable Children.
Lizzie Morton blogs on how Corporate Parents are taking ownership of their new duties.
Kenny McGhee reflects on the Scottish Care Leavers Covenant, six months after the launch.
Kenny McGhee talks about his research into implementing Staying Put for care leavers.
Linda O'Neill tells the story behind the recent education statistics.
Kenny McGhee responds to the recent STV 'Who Cares' programme by exploring the need for genuine and caring relationships and removing barriers for looked after children and young people.
Why permanence matters for looked after children, and why we must share our passion to improve.
Jennifer Davidson blogs about what 2016 has meant for the children’s sector and what the year ahead will bring.
We are now moving towards a professionalism that is defined by passion and commitment expressed through the transparent and responsible use of relationships.
Norma Brown of Falkirk Council describes their Moneywise project and the difference it's making to the lives of care leavers in the area.
We need access to data at both population and individual levels if we're to be successful in improving the attainment of looked after children.
What does relational based practice look like in reality, for a busy statutory team?
Dr Chrissie Gale, international lead for CELCIS, reflects on research which could help shape the drive for better alternative care for children in countries around the world.
Charlie Gracie tells of a new creative writing comp for looked after children
Course moderator Sarah Hume-Anthony gives a snapshot of the interactions on the CELCIS MOOC.
Dr Graham Connelly discusses the use of acronyms when talking about looked after children and children in care.
Active Implementation - what it is, what it is not, and how it could help bring about lasting change to children's services.
How the Student Support Review Group is trying to ensure care experienced students have a fair standard of living.
Introducing issue 12 of REACH, which explores stigma, language, perception and the representation of care and care experience.
Amanda Lawler explains why CELCIS really cares about training and learning.
Stephanie is a Modern Apprentice at CELCIS, and here she talks about landing her first ‘real’ job at only 16.
The importance for children in residential care to develop the ability to navigate friendships with each other.
The difficult issue of self-harm in residential care, exploring the experiences of young people and the support workers need to help.
Gordon Main talks about how commitment in the care system is not enough.
Jillian Ingram ponders how getting a train from A to B might just offer clues to how to meet children’s needs.
Gordon Main continues the conversation on commitment, discussing the emotional investment of foster carers.
Claire Burns introduces the evidence into practice theme of the new issue of our REACH publication.
This blog post explores the findings of a recent briefing from CELCIS about going to university from care.
Joe Rankin of the Nevis Group talks about whether young people should tell future employers that they're care experienced. With video of James Calder.
Dr Chrissie Gale, CELCIS international lead, argues that we need agencies to unite with one voice if we want to uphold children’s rights internationally.
To mark World Social Work Day, Janine Fraser, a Social Work Team Leader for Glasgow City Health and Social Care Partnership in North East Glasgow, reflects on her profession and the challenges it faces.
This article was first published by TES on the support teachers can offer unaccompanied and separated children.
Guest Joe Rankin of the Nevis Group discusses the need to stamp out stigma for those with care experience.
A version of this blog post was first published in The Times on 26 July 2019.
Ahead of the Global Implementation Conference, Scotland’s National Clinical Director, Professor Jason Leitch CBE shares some thoughts on his implementation journey, Scotland’s increasing use of change methodologies, and why learning from others makes sense
Introducing a series of blog posts which will consider the use of physical restraint in residential child care from multiple perspectives.
Laura Steckley explains how people are coming together to consider how to apply what we know about both experience and theory to address the practice of restraint in residential care.
First published by Citizens Theatre, 30 January 2020.
How the Care Experienced Bursary is making a difference in the lives of care experienced young people.
Bairnshoose Policy and Practice Lead Anna O'Reilly reflects on how far we've come towards securing a Scottish Bairnshoose, and what must still be done to give children the rights they deserve.
Elaine Adams, Learning and Development Lead at Children’s Hearings Improvement Partnership, writes about the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on Children’s Hearings in Scotland and what this might mean for hearings in the future
Jacqui Dunbar is the Project Lead at Our Hearings, Our Voice, an independent board for children and young people who have experience of the Children’s Hearings System in Scotland and want to help improve it. She works directly with 11 children and young people, 9 who are members of the board and 2 who are advisors for Our Hearings, Our Voice.
Elaine Hamilton, Service Manager at Nether Johnstone House describes how lockdown due to the current emergency health crisis has changed the thinking, outlooks, and actions of both the young people and the team that surround them.
Food and other essential items are something that we have always had available for our young people in the Youth Team, Aberdeen but we were aware that when COVID – 19 hit that we would need to be more creative about how we made sure food was available for young people in a safe and structured way.
Claire Burns, Director of CELCIS (Acting), takes a moment to consider how much we have learned that we didn’t know before the COVID-19; how this emergency has thrown a spotlight on so much of what we already knew and what this means as we work to make change happen to realise The Promise.
Jo Cochrane is the Children’s Services Development and Assurance Team Manager at Dumfries and Galloway Council, since retired. Since 2018, CELCIS has been working alongside local public sector partnerships in Dumfries and Galloway, Falkirk, and East and Midlothian, to develop a Minimum Dataset for use across all 30 of Scotland’s Child Protection Committees.
Claire Burns, Director (Acting), CELCIS – Centre for Excellence for Children’s Care and Protection discusses how COVID-19 has exacerbated inequalities in society.

Blog

Year: 2015
Topic: Foster care, Looked after at home, Residential care
Author: staff and guest bloggers

The latest CELCIS Education Forum was held online on Wednesday 30 March on the theme of using Scotland's Secure Care Pathway and…
Our submission focuses on the impact of low income, debt and poverty on care leavers in Scotland. To mitigate this impact, we…
The Scottish Government has produced an implementation plan setting out what it will do to Keep The Promise by 2030. This plan…
CELCIS has responded to the Scottish Social Services Council's consultation on ‘A register for the future’.
This resource is designed to help people in Scotland working with and supporting children and families in professional,…
This briefing highlights the key findings published in CELCIS’s research on the implementation of Continuing Care in Scotland.…
This research aims to identify and better understand what it is that enables and challenges the necessary improvements needed at…
As part of Kinship Care Week 2022 Lorna Stabler, a Researcher and PhD student at Cardiff University, writes about being a…

Book reviews

Who Cares? Scotland consulted with 87 young people to establish their experiences of living in care, their hopes for life after care and the types of support they would need to achieve this.

The Children and Young People (Scotland) Act 2014 has the ability to change the disproportionately poor outcomes of this often forgotten group of young people. It provides new rights and opportunities, ensuring the voices of care experienced children and young people are heard in any discussions or planning which affects their lives.

The views presented here are intended to help corporate parents and others involved in the implementation of the Act to get it right for every care experienced child and young person across Scotland.

Ciara Waugh is an art and design student who has been working with other young people to co-produce national information materials on the right to continuing care for young people. Here she writes about why this project is so close to her heart.
Together, young people with experience of care, CELCIS, the Care Inspectorate and Clan Childlaw, have produced a new information resource to help inform care experienced young people about continuing care.
The Scottish Government has today (28 July 2022) published the national Education Outcomes for Looked After Children for 2020-21 statistics report.
We are looking for two experienced administrators to join our team at CELCIS, the Centre for Excellence for Children’s Care and Protection.
CELCIS's response to the Scottish Government’s consultation on 'National Improvement Framework – enhanced data collection for improvement' highlights the importance of regarding data as a means to understanding how care experienced learners and their families experience education
Data is an important resource that can give us insight into the wellbeing and experiences of children and young people in need of care and protection. CELCIS organises research projects and surveys to gather information about how children and young people and their fanilies are helped by those who care for them. This can help practitioners to make informed decisions about children’s lives, and helps to support managers and leaders in their drive to improve practice and services.
In-person and online participation event
Pauline Stratford from Skills Development Scotland (SDS), spoke about its recent Career Review, which aims to ensure that career services in Scotland are fit for purpose and future proofed to meet the demands of a changing world of work.
This webinar focused on the themes and recommendations of the UN Committee on the Rights of the Child’s Day of General Discussion (DGD) about the rights of children and young people in alternative care.
CELCIS supports the review of existing Home Education guidance. In our consultation response we suggest ways in which the proposed draft could be strengthened to prioritise children’s rights, and to ensure effective safeguards are in place to meet the needs of all children in Scotland, including those who are home educated.
This report provides an insight into the role of Virtual School Head Teachers (VSHTs) and Care Experienced Teams (CETs) in Scotland through a diverse range of case studies. These provide examples of how VSHTs are using creativity, compassion, and communication to establish new, innovative and alternative ways of supporting care experienced children and young people during their education journey so that children and young people can feel more settled, confident, and motivated, ensuring a better experience at school.
Dr Autumn Roesch-Marsh, Professor Ruth Emond and Dr Helen Whincup draw on their experiences in teaching Social Work students to consider how The Promise should be incorporated into courses to ensure that new social work practitioners are equipped with the knowledge and skills to understand and support the changes The Promise calls for.
CELCIS’s response to the Scottish Government’s consultation on a Children’s Care & Justice Bill. Here, we respond to proposals on changes to decision making and processes within the Children’s Hearing System and criminal justice system, to secure care settings, and to the support of children in residential care settings who arrive in Scotland from other nations within the UK (known as ‘cross border placements’).
As part of Refugee Week 2022, Paul Sullivan, Sector Engagement Lead at CELCIS, and Professor Ravi Kohli, a researcher at the University of Bedfordshire, reflect on their work with the Drawing Together project, which focuses on the everyday lives of young refugees in Finland, Norway and Scotland, and discuss some of the key themes that have emerged so far.
During Refugee Week, Lorraine Ward writes about why connections are key in helping young asylum seekers and refugees to build happy, fulfilling lives in their new countries.
During Refugee Week, Christine and Hamid reflect together on their involvement in the Drawing Together project and NYPS, the experiences of refugees in Scotland, and their hopes for the future.
SIRCC is a key annual conference for all those working and living with, and within, the residential child care community in Scotland. Over the lifetime of this event, it has explored some big themes, including the power of relationships, culture, aspiration, the care journey, and pushing the boundaries of the system we exist within.
The Minimum Dataset for Child Protection Committees responds to an action within the Scottish Government’s Child Protection Improvement Programme to: • Deliver robust data sets to support child protection improvement. • Develop a national resource for advice on using child protection data for local planning and service development. • Expand analytical capacity.
Hazel Rogers is new to fostering and here she discusses her journey to find out more about continuing care to give her the confidence to support the young person in her care.
Anne-Marie Coyle has been a foster carer for over 15 years with the Kibble Intensive Fostering Service, which provides fostering for children and young people aged five and above with complex needs. Here she describes what it takes to provide good quality care, the rewards, and the challenges.
Why do I hesitate when people ask what I do to say I am a foster carer? What makes me wait and judge the person before saying I am a foster carer, yet it is a role I have done for nearly twenty years alongside other professions. I hesitate because of judgement and stigma of the children I care for. I hesitate to protect the children and young people who are with me now, to protect those who came before, from that stigma and judgement.
love inc project – learnings and resources From the early stages of this Independent Care Review, there were strong, clear and passionate messages from the hundreds of people with lived experience of care they spoke to. These messages stated that they wanted to and should feel more love in their lives. Since that time, there has been an in increased understanding of how important feeling loved whilst experiencing care is to children and young people, and the huge impact that loving relationships can have on their ability to not just survive, but to thrive, both during their care experience and once they leave care.
Welcome to the spring 2022 issue of the Scottish Journal of Residential Child Care (SJRCC). This year marks the Journal’s 20th anniversary. The Journal was first published, in hard copy, in autumn of 2002 and we have exciting plans to mark this important milestone in and around the autumn issue.
Ciara Waugh is an art and design student who has been working with other young people to co-produce national information materials on the right to continuing care for young people. Here she writes about why this project is so close to her heart.
Together, young people with experience of care, CELCIS, the Care Inspectorate and Clan Childlaw, have produced a new information resource to help inform care experienced young people about continuing care.
The Scottish Government has today (28 July 2022) published the national Education Outcomes for Looked After Children for 2020-21 statistics report.
We are looking for two experienced administrators to join our team at CELCIS, the Centre for Excellence for Children’s Care and Protection.
CELCIS's response to the Scottish Government’s consultation on 'National Improvement Framework – enhanced data collection for improvement' highlights the importance of regarding data as a means to understanding how care experienced learners and their families experience education
Data is an important resource that can give us insight into the wellbeing and experiences of children and young people in need of care and protection. CELCIS organises research projects and surveys to gather information about how children and young people and their fanilies are helped by those who care for them. This can help practitioners to make informed decisions about children’s lives, and helps to support managers and leaders in their drive to improve practice and services.
In-person and online participation event
Pauline Stratford from Skills Development Scotland (SDS), spoke about its recent Career Review, which aims to ensure that career services in Scotland are fit for purpose and future proofed to meet the demands of a changing world of work.
This webinar focused on the themes and recommendations of the UN Committee on the Rights of the Child’s Day of General Discussion (DGD) about the rights of children and young people in alternative care.
CELCIS supports the review of existing Home Education guidance. In our consultation response we suggest ways in which the proposed draft could be strengthened to prioritise children’s rights, and to ensure effective safeguards are in place to meet the needs of all children in Scotland, including those who are home educated.
This report provides an insight into the role of Virtual School Head Teachers (VSHTs) and Care Experienced Teams (CETs) in Scotland through a diverse range of case studies. These provide examples of how VSHTs are using creativity, compassion, and communication to establish new, innovative and alternative ways of supporting care experienced children and young people during their education journey so that children and young people can feel more settled, confident, and motivated, ensuring a better experience at school.
Dr Autumn Roesch-Marsh, Professor Ruth Emond and Dr Helen Whincup draw on their experiences in teaching Social Work students to consider how The Promise should be incorporated into courses to ensure that new social work practitioners are equipped with the knowledge and skills to understand and support the changes The Promise calls for.
CELCIS’s response to the Scottish Government’s consultation on a Children’s Care & Justice Bill. Here, we respond to proposals on changes to decision making and processes within the Children’s Hearing System and criminal justice system, to secure care settings, and to the support of children in residential care settings who arrive in Scotland from other nations within the UK (known as ‘cross border placements’).
As part of Refugee Week 2022, Paul Sullivan, Sector Engagement Lead at CELCIS, and Professor Ravi Kohli, a researcher at the University of Bedfordshire, reflect on their work with the Drawing Together project, which focuses on the everyday lives of young refugees in Finland, Norway and Scotland, and discuss some of the key themes that have emerged so far.
During Refugee Week, Lorraine Ward writes about why connections are key in helping young asylum seekers and refugees to build happy, fulfilling lives in their new countries.
During Refugee Week, Christine and Hamid reflect together on their involvement in the Drawing Together project and NYPS, the experiences of refugees in Scotland, and their hopes for the future.
SIRCC is a key annual conference for all those working and living with, and within, the residential child care community in Scotland. Over the lifetime of this event, it has explored some big themes, including the power of relationships, culture, aspiration, the care journey, and pushing the boundaries of the system we exist within.
The Minimum Dataset for Child Protection Committees responds to an action within the Scottish Government’s Child Protection Improvement Programme to: • Deliver robust data sets to support child protection improvement. • Develop a national resource for advice on using child protection data for local planning and service development. • Expand analytical capacity.
Hazel Rogers is new to fostering and here she discusses her journey to find out more about continuing care to give her the confidence to support the young person in her care.
Anne-Marie Coyle has been a foster carer for over 15 years with the Kibble Intensive Fostering Service, which provides fostering for children and young people aged five and above with complex needs. Here she describes what it takes to provide good quality care, the rewards, and the challenges.
Why do I hesitate when people ask what I do to say I am a foster carer? What makes me wait and judge the person before saying I am a foster carer, yet it is a role I have done for nearly twenty years alongside other professions. I hesitate because of judgement and stigma of the children I care for. I hesitate to protect the children and young people who are with me now, to protect those who came before, from that stigma and judgement.
love inc project – learnings and resources From the early stages of this Independent Care Review, there were strong, clear and passionate messages from the hundreds of people with lived experience of care they spoke to. These messages stated that they wanted to and should feel more love in their lives. Since that time, there has been an in increased understanding of how important feeling loved whilst experiencing care is to children and young people, and the huge impact that loving relationships can have on their ability to not just survive, but to thrive, both during their care experience and once they leave care.
Welcome to the spring 2022 issue of the Scottish Journal of Residential Child Care (SJRCC). This year marks the Journal’s 20th anniversary. The Journal was first published, in hard copy, in autumn of 2002 and we have exciting plans to mark this important milestone in and around the autumn issue.
Ciara Waugh is an art and design student who has been working with other young people to co-produce national information materials on the right to continuing care for young people. Here she writes about why this project is so close to her heart.
Together, young people with experience of care, CELCIS, the Care Inspectorate and Clan Childlaw, have produced a new information resource to help inform care experienced young people about continuing care.
The Scottish Government has today (28 July 2022) published the national Education Outcomes for Looked After Children for 2020-21 statistics report.
We are looking for two experienced administrators to join our team at CELCIS, the Centre for Excellence for Children’s Care and Protection.
CELCIS's response to the Scottish Government’s consultation on 'National Improvement Framework – enhanced data collection for improvement' highlights the importance of regarding data as a means to understanding how care experienced learners and their families experience education
Data is an important resource that can give us insight into the wellbeing and experiences of children and young people in need of care and protection. CELCIS organises research projects and surveys to gather information about how children and young people and their fanilies are helped by those who care for them. This can help practitioners to make informed decisions about children’s lives, and helps to support managers and leaders in their drive to improve practice and services.
In-person and online participation event
Pauline Stratford from Skills Development Scotland (SDS), spoke about its recent Career Review, which aims to ensure that career services in Scotland are fit for purpose and future proofed to meet the demands of a changing world of work.
This webinar focused on the themes and recommendations of the UN Committee on the Rights of the Child’s Day of General Discussion (DGD) about the rights of children and young people in alternative care.
CELCIS supports the review of existing Home Education guidance. In our consultation response we suggest ways in which the proposed draft could be strengthened to prioritise children’s rights, and to ensure effective safeguards are in place to meet the needs of all children in Scotland, including those who are home educated.
This report provides an insight into the role of Virtual School Head Teachers (VSHTs) and Care Experienced Teams (CETs) in Scotland through a diverse range of case studies. These provide examples of how VSHTs are using creativity, compassion, and communication to establish new, innovative and alternative ways of supporting care experienced children and young people during their education journey so that children and young people can feel more settled, confident, and motivated, ensuring a better experience at school.
Dr Autumn Roesch-Marsh, Professor Ruth Emond and Dr Helen Whincup draw on their experiences in teaching Social Work students to consider how The Promise should be incorporated into courses to ensure that new social work practitioners are equipped with the knowledge and skills to understand and support the changes The Promise calls for.
CELCIS’s response to the Scottish Government’s consultation on a Children’s Care & Justice Bill. Here, we respond to proposals on changes to decision making and processes within the Children’s Hearing System and criminal justice system, to secure care settings, and to the support of children in residential care settings who arrive in Scotland from other nations within the UK (known as ‘cross border placements’).
As part of Refugee Week 2022, Paul Sullivan, Sector Engagement Lead at CELCIS, and Professor Ravi Kohli, a researcher at the University of Bedfordshire, reflect on their work with the Drawing Together project, which focuses on the everyday lives of young refugees in Finland, Norway and Scotland, and discuss some of the key themes that have emerged so far.
During Refugee Week, Lorraine Ward writes about why connections are key in helping young asylum seekers and refugees to build happy, fulfilling lives in their new countries.
During Refugee Week, Christine and Hamid reflect together on their involvement in the Drawing Together project and NYPS, the experiences of refugees in Scotland, and their hopes for the future.
SIRCC is a key annual conference for all those working and living with, and within, the residential child care community in Scotland. Over the lifetime of this event, it has explored some big themes, including the power of relationships, culture, aspiration, the care journey, and pushing the boundaries of the system we exist within.
The Minimum Dataset for Child Protection Committees responds to an action within the Scottish Government’s Child Protection Improvement Programme to: • Deliver robust data sets to support child protection improvement. • Develop a national resource for advice on using child protection data for local planning and service development. • Expand analytical capacity.
Hazel Rogers is new to fostering and here she discusses her journey to find out more about continuing care to give her the confidence to support the young person in her care.
Anne-Marie Coyle has been a foster carer for over 15 years with the Kibble Intensive Fostering Service, which provides fostering for children and young people aged five and above with complex needs. Here she describes what it takes to provide good quality care, the rewards, and the challenges.
Why do I hesitate when people ask what I do to say I am a foster carer? What makes me wait and judge the person before saying I am a foster carer, yet it is a role I have done for nearly twenty years alongside other professions. I hesitate because of judgement and stigma of the children I care for. I hesitate to protect the children and young people who are with me now, to protect those who came before, from that stigma and judgement.
love inc project – learnings and resources From the early stages of this Independent Care Review, there were strong, clear and passionate messages from the hundreds of people with lived experience of care they spoke to. These messages stated that they wanted to and should feel more love in their lives. Since that time, there has been an in increased understanding of how important feeling loved whilst experiencing care is to children and young people, and the huge impact that loving relationships can have on their ability to not just survive, but to thrive, both during their care experience and once they leave care.
Welcome to the spring 2022 issue of the Scottish Journal of Residential Child Care (SJRCC). This year marks the Journal’s 20th anniversary. The Journal was first published, in hard copy, in autumn of 2002 and we have exciting plans to mark this important milestone in and around the autumn issue.
Ciara Waugh is an art and design student who has been working with other young people to co-produce national information materials on the right to continuing care for young people. Here she writes about why this project is so close to her heart.
Together, young people with experience of care, CELCIS, the Care Inspectorate and Clan Childlaw, have produced a new information resource to help inform care experienced young people about continuing care.
The Scottish Government has today (28 July 2022) published the national Education Outcomes for Looked After Children for 2020-21 statistics report.
We are looking for two experienced administrators to join our team at CELCIS, the Centre for Excellence for Children’s Care and Protection.
CELCIS's response to the Scottish Government’s consultation on 'National Improvement Framework – enhanced data collection for improvement' highlights the importance of regarding data as a means to understanding how care experienced learners and their families experience education
Data is an important resource that can give us insight into the wellbeing and experiences of children and young people in need of care and protection. CELCIS organises research projects and surveys to gather information about how children and young people and their fanilies are helped by those who care for them. This can help practitioners to make informed decisions about children’s lives, and helps to support managers and leaders in their drive to improve practice and services.
In-person and online participation event
Pauline Stratford from Skills Development Scotland (SDS), spoke about its recent Career Review, which aims to ensure that career services in Scotland are fit for purpose and future proofed to meet the demands of a changing world of work.
This webinar focused on the themes and recommendations of the UN Committee on the Rights of the Child’s Day of General Discussion (DGD) about the rights of children and young people in alternative care.
CELCIS supports the review of existing Home Education guidance. In our consultation response we suggest ways in which the proposed draft could be strengthened to prioritise children’s rights, and to ensure effective safeguards are in place to meet the needs of all children in Scotland, including those who are home educated.
This report provides an insight into the role of Virtual School Head Teachers (VSHTs) and Care Experienced Teams (CETs) in Scotland through a diverse range of case studies. These provide examples of how VSHTs are using creativity, compassion, and communication to establish new, innovative and alternative ways of supporting care experienced children and young people during their education journey so that children and young people can feel more settled, confident, and motivated, ensuring a better experience at school.
Dr Autumn Roesch-Marsh, Professor Ruth Emond and Dr Helen Whincup draw on their experiences in teaching Social Work students to consider how The Promise should be incorporated into courses to ensure that new social work practitioners are equipped with the knowledge and skills to understand and support the changes The Promise calls for.
CELCIS’s response to the Scottish Government’s consultation on a Children’s Care & Justice Bill. Here, we respond to proposals on changes to decision making and processes within the Children’s Hearing System and criminal justice system, to secure care settings, and to the support of children in residential care settings who arrive in Scotland from other nations within the UK (known as ‘cross border placements’).
As part of Refugee Week 2022, Paul Sullivan, Sector Engagement Lead at CELCIS, and Professor Ravi Kohli, a researcher at the University of Bedfordshire, reflect on their work with the Drawing Together project, which focuses on the everyday lives of young refugees in Finland, Norway and Scotland, and discuss some of the key themes that have emerged so far.
During Refugee Week, Lorraine Ward writes about why connections are key in helping young asylum seekers and refugees to build happy, fulfilling lives in their new countries.
During Refugee Week, Christine and Hamid reflect together on their involvement in the Drawing Together project and NYPS, the experiences of refugees in Scotland, and their hopes for the future.
SIRCC is a key annual conference for all those working and living with, and within, the residential child care community in Scotland. Over the lifetime of this event, it has explored some big themes, including the power of relationships, culture, aspiration, the care journey, and pushing the boundaries of the system we exist within.
The Minimum Dataset for Child Protection Committees responds to an action within the Scottish Government’s Child Protection Improvement Programme to: • Deliver robust data sets to support child protection improvement. • Develop a national resource for advice on using child protection data for local planning and service development. • Expand analytical capacity.
Hazel Rogers is new to fostering and here she discusses her journey to find out more about continuing care to give her the confidence to support the young person in her care.
Anne-Marie Coyle has been a foster carer for over 15 years with the Kibble Intensive Fostering Service, which provides fostering for children and young people aged five and above with complex needs. Here she describes what it takes to provide good quality care, the rewards, and the challenges.
Why do I hesitate when people ask what I do to say I am a foster carer? What makes me wait and judge the person before saying I am a foster carer, yet it is a role I have done for nearly twenty years alongside other professions. I hesitate because of judgement and stigma of the children I care for. I hesitate to protect the children and young people who are with me now, to protect those who came before, from that stigma and judgement.
love inc project – learnings and resources From the early stages of this Independent Care Review, there were strong, clear and passionate messages from the hundreds of people with lived experience of care they spoke to. These messages stated that they wanted to and should feel more love in their lives. Since that time, there has been an in increased understanding of how important feeling loved whilst experiencing care is to children and young people, and the huge impact that loving relationships can have on their ability to not just survive, but to thrive, both during their care experience and once they leave care.
Welcome to the spring 2022 issue of the Scottish Journal of Residential Child Care (SJRCC). This year marks the Journal’s 20th anniversary. The Journal was first published, in hard copy, in autumn of 2002 and we have exciting plans to mark this important milestone in and around the autumn issue.