CELCIS Blog

Our blog is a hub for perspectives and analysis of issues that matter to the lives of children, young people and their families. You will hear from our staff and guest bloggers on many topical issues where they will be reflecting and sharing their policy, practice and research insights..

Got a burning issue you would like to blog about? Then we would love to hear from you. Contact our communications team.

Read on and join in the chat...

The views expressed in the posts on this blog are those of the author/s and may not represent the views or opinions of CELCIS or our funders. 

Michelle McCue blogs about the 2015 SIRCC conference and its focus on how residential child care is changing.
Vicki Welch blogs on the good and bad of integrating services.
Attend, encourage and enjoy to learn - a blog by Graham Connelly
Jennifer Davidson blogs about her mission to change the world for the better.
Leaving care too early. Kenny McGhee blogs on the problems facing care leavers in Scotland.
In this blog Liz Brabender discusses how CELCIS tackles drift and delay in permanency.
A blog by Linda O'Neill discussing what children had to say in the recent Rees Centre report
Ainsley Hainey blogs about the success of the Massive Open Online Course on Caring for Vulnerable Children.
Lizzie Morton blogs on how Corporate Parents are taking ownership of their new duties.
Kenny McGhee reflects on the Scottish Care Leavers Covenant, six months after the launch.
Kenny McGhee talks about his research into implementing Staying Put for care leavers.
Linda O'Neill tells the story behind the recent education statistics.
Kenny McGhee responds to the recent STV 'Who Cares' programme by exploring the need for genuine and caring relationships and removing barriers for looked after children and young people.
Why permanence matters for looked after children, and why we must share our passion to improve.
Jennifer Davidson blogs about what 2016 has meant for the children’s sector and what the year ahead will bring.
We are now moving towards a professionalism that is defined by passion and commitment expressed through the transparent and responsible use of relationships.
Norma Brown of Falkirk Council describes their Moneywise project and the difference it's making to the lives of care leavers in the area.
We need access to data at both population and individual levels if we're to be successful in improving the attainment of looked after children.
What does relational based practice look like in reality, for a busy statutory team?
Dr Chrissie Gale, international lead for CELCIS, reflects on research which could help shape the drive for better alternative care for children in countries around the world.
Charlie Gracie tells of a new creative writing comp for looked after children
Course moderator Sarah Hume-Anthony gives a snapshot of the interactions on the CELCIS MOOC.
Dr Graham Connelly discusses the use of acronyms when talking about looked after children and children in care.
Active Implementation - what it is, what it is not, and how it could help bring about lasting change to children's services.
How the Student Support Review Group is trying to ensure care experienced students have a fair standard of living.
Introducing issue 12 of REACH, which explores stigma, language, perception and the representation of care and care experience.
Amanda Lawler explains why CELCIS really cares about training and learning.
Stephanie is a Modern Apprentice at CELCIS, and here she talks about landing her first ‘real’ job at only 16.
The importance for children in residential care to develop the ability to navigate friendships with each other.
The difficult issue of self-harm in residential care, exploring the experiences of young people and the support workers need to help.
Gordon Main talks about how commitment in the care system is not enough.
Jillian Ingram ponders how getting a train from A to B might just offer clues to how to meet children’s needs.
Gordon Main continues the conversation on commitment, discussing the emotional investment of foster carers.
Claire Burns introduces the evidence into practice theme of the new issue of our REACH publication.
This blog post explores the findings of a recent briefing from CELCIS about going to university from care.
Joe Rankin of the Nevis Group talks about whether young people should tell future employers that they're care experienced. With video of James Calder.
Dr Chrissie Gale, CELCIS international lead, argues that we need agencies to unite with one voice if we want to uphold children’s rights internationally.
To mark World Social Work Day, Janine Fraser, a Social Work Team Leader for Glasgow City Health and Social Care Partnership in North East Glasgow, reflects on her profession and the challenges it faces.
This article was first published by TES on the support teachers can offer unaccompanied and separated children.
Guest Joe Rankin of the Nevis Group discusses the need to stamp out stigma for those with care experience.
A version of this blog post was first published in The Times on 26 July 2019.
Ahead of the Global Implementation Conference, Scotland’s National Clinical Director, Professor Jason Leitch CBE shares some thoughts on his implementation journey, Scotland’s increasing use of change methodologies, and why learning from others makes sense
Introducing a series of blog posts which will consider the use of physical restraint in residential child care from multiple perspectives.
Laura Steckley explains how people are coming together to consider how to apply what we know about both experience and theory to address the practice of restraint in residential care.
First published by Citizens Theatre, 30 January 2020.
How the Care Experienced Bursary is making a difference in the lives of care experienced young people.
Bairnshoose Policy and Practice Lead Anna O'Reilly reflects on how far we've come towards securing a Scottish Bairnshoose, and what must still be done to give children the rights they deserve.
Elaine Adams, Learning and Development Lead at Children’s Hearings Improvement Partnership, writes about the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on Children’s Hearings in Scotland and what this might mean for hearings in the future
Jacqui Dunbar is the Project Lead at Our Hearings, Our Voice, an independent board for children and young people who have experience of the Children’s Hearings System in Scotland and want to help improve it. She works directly with 11 children and young people, 9 who are members of the board and 2 who are advisors for Our Hearings, Our Voice.
Elaine Hamilton, Service Manager at Nether Johnstone House describes how lockdown due to the current emergency health crisis has changed the thinking, outlooks, and actions of both the young people and the team that surround them.
Food and other essential items are something that we have always had available for our young people in the Youth Team, Aberdeen but we were aware that when COVID – 19 hit that we would need to be more creative about how we made sure food was available for young people in a safe and structured way.
Claire Burns, Director of CELCIS (Acting), takes a moment to consider how much we have learned that we didn’t know before the COVID-19; how this emergency has thrown a spotlight on so much of what we already knew and what this means as we work to make change happen to realise The Promise.
Jo Cochrane is the Children’s Services Development and Assurance Team Manager at Dumfries and Galloway Council, since retired. Since 2018, CELCIS has been working alongside local public sector partnerships in Dumfries and Galloway, Falkirk, and East and Midlothian, to develop a Minimum Dataset for use across all 30 of Scotland’s Child Protection Committees.
Claire Burns, Director (Acting), CELCIS – Centre for Excellence for Children’s Care and Protection discusses how COVID-19 has exacerbated inequalities in society.

Blog

Year: 2015
Topic: Foster care, Looked after at home, Residential care
Author: staff and guest bloggers

This Foundations report from Healthcare Improvement Scotland and Care Inspectorate highlights examples of current practice and…
This new factsheet from the Scottish Government sets out a vision for how Barnahus should be implemented in Scotland, the values…
The Scottish Government published new National Guidance for Child Protection in Scotland 2021. Replacing the National Guidance…
The Scottish Journal of Residential Child Care is a peer-reviewed, open access e-journal which aims to provide a rich forum for…
The Civil Service Care Leaver Internship offers care leavers aged 18-30 the opportunity to undertake paid 12-month internships…
The Scottish Government has published new Learning Review Guidance following a review of its approach to learning from child…
Replacing the National Guidance for Child Protection in Scotland, last published in 2014, this revised guidance describes the…
For all of us involved in supporting children and families, the pandemic has shown that building back better from COVID-19…

Book reviews

Who Cares? Scotland consulted with 87 young people to establish their experiences of living in care, their hopes for life after care and the types of support they would need to achieve this.

The Children and Young People (Scotland) Act 2014 has the ability to change the disproportionately poor outcomes of this often forgotten group of young people. It provides new rights and opportunities, ensuring the voices of care experienced children and young people are heard in any discussions or planning which affects their lives.

The views presented here are intended to help corporate parents and others involved in the implementation of the Act to get it right for every care experienced child and young person across Scotland.

This Foundations report from Healthcare Improvement Scotland and Care Inspectorate highlights examples of current practice and models, particular areas of excellence and new research evidence and literature relating to the formation of a Scottish Barnahus (Bairns’ Hoose).
This new factsheet from the Scottish Government sets out a vision for how Barnahus should be implemented in Scotland, the values which should underpin the model and the approach to its practical implementation.
As a leading improvement centre in Scotland, our focus is always: is this in the best interests of children and young people in need of care and protection, their families and carers? It is this question that is driving our analysis and consideration of the proposals in the new National Care Service for Scotland currently out for consultation.
The Scottish Government published new National Guidance for Child Protection in Scotland 2021. Replacing the National Guidance for Child Protection in Scotland, last published in 2014, this revised guidance describes the responsibilities and expectations of everyone who works with, or comes into contact with, children and young people, families and carers in Scotland.
The Scottish Journal of Residential Child Care is a peer-reviewed, open access e-journal which aims to provide a rich forum for debate and dissemination about the topical issues in residential child care research, policy and practice.
The Scottish Government has today (7 September) announced investment of £500m in a new Whole Family Wellbeing Fund. Announcing the funding in the new Programme for Government for 2021-22, the First Minister explained that this funding aims to enable the building of universal, holistic support services, to be available in communities across Scotland, giving families access to the help they need, where and when they need it.
The Civil Service Care Leaver Internship offers care leavers aged 18-30 the opportunity to undertake paid 12-month internships in government departments and agencies throughout the UK. In this blog post, four current interns working in different departments in the Scottish Government discuss the application process, their experiences as interns, and offer advice for potential applicants.
The focus for SIRCC 2021 Online will be on what is needed to support the residential child care workforce as they care for children and young people. Following on from the reports from the Independent Care Review and the setting up of The Promise to facilitate and support change, wherever that change needs to happen, it’s essential that this community of practitioners is in the best place possible to support, develop and love those in their care.
The Scottish Government has published new Learning Review Guidance following a review of its approach to learning from child protection cases. This replaces guidance on conducting Significant Case Reviews published in 2015.
Replacing the National Guidance for Child Protection in Scotland, last published in 2014, this revised guidance describes the responsibilities and expectations of everyone who works with, or comes into contact with, children and young people, families and carers in Scotland.
The Scottish Government has published new National Guidance for Child Protection in Scotland. Replacing the National Guidance for Child Protection in Scotland, last published in 2014, this revised guidance describes the responsibilities and expectations of everyone who works with, or comes into contact with, children and young people, families and carers in Scotland.
The Scottish Government has awarded further funding to CELCIS to invest in the continued development of Scotland’s Virtual School Head Teachers’ Network.
Inclusion, experience and value in participation. In this Network Event, we explore the theme of inclusion, experience and value in participation projects, and how organisations in Scotland use different approaches, depending on the context.
For all of us involved in supporting children and families, the pandemic has shown that building back better from COVID-19 doesn’t mean returning to our previous ways of working; it means resetting them. Now, as I reflect on the last 12 months, it is clear that Scotland is on the path to making the changes and improvements that need to happen – and are already happening – for our children and families.
Alison Cowper, Service Manager with the Independent Care and Review Team (Children and Families) at Glasgow City Health and Social Care Partnership talks about how ‘what does this mean for Fred?’ influenced their work with CELCIS when process mapping their current system.
At our May 2021 Education Forum meeting we were delighted to welcome four Attainment Advisors from Education Scotland who shared information, insights and practical examples of their work as part of the the Scottish Attainment Challenge with a focus on improving attainment for care experienced children and young people.
A Consultants Working Group was instrumental on helping to shape the content, tone and language of Scotland’s new National Practice Guidance to support the rights of care experienced children and their brothers and sisters in Scotland. Here, one of the consultants Saffron Rohan, discusses the process of contributing to the development of the guidance, and the importance of listening to and embedding lived experience in changes to policy and practice.
Since founding STAR, and in my time as a foster carer, I’ve seen and heard first-hand the impact of one of the most heart-breaking problems of the care system: children being separated from their brothers and sisters, at times in homes that are far away from each other, or being prevented from having a relationship at all.
A kinship carer who has looked after her granddaughter for the past decade shares some of the challenges and the rewards this brings.
This National Practice Guidance for Scotland is designed to contribute to the effective implementation of new legislative changes introduced under the Children (Scotland) Act 2020 to uphold the rights and meet the needs of children with care experience and their families.
The Scottish Government has published new National Practice Guidance, ‘Staying Together and Connected: Getting it Right for Sisters and Brothers’ to support new legislative changes coming into effect today, 26 July.
Aileen Nicol, Head of Improving Protection and Permanence at Celcis, a member of Stand Up For Siblings, has written a blog about the new National Practice Guidance ‘Staying Together and Connected: Getting it right for sisters and brothers’.
As CELCIS, in partnership with Coram Voice, launches the Bright Spots programme pilot in Scotland, this blog post reflects on the experience of one local authority's participation in the programme in England.
This report was prepared by CELCIS in collaboration with local authorities and stakeholders in Scotland to inform the Scottish Government Children and Families Collective Leadership Group's consideration of the impact of COVID-19 on children and families.
This Foundations report from Healthcare Improvement Scotland and Care Inspectorate highlights examples of current practice and models, particular areas of excellence and new research evidence and literature relating to the formation of a Scottish Barnahus (Bairns’ Hoose).
This new factsheet from the Scottish Government sets out a vision for how Barnahus should be implemented in Scotland, the values which should underpin the model and the approach to its practical implementation.
As a leading improvement centre in Scotland, our focus is always: is this in the best interests of children and young people in need of care and protection, their families and carers? It is this question that is driving our analysis and consideration of the proposals in the new National Care Service for Scotland currently out for consultation.
The Scottish Government published new National Guidance for Child Protection in Scotland 2021. Replacing the National Guidance for Child Protection in Scotland, last published in 2014, this revised guidance describes the responsibilities and expectations of everyone who works with, or comes into contact with, children and young people, families and carers in Scotland.
The Scottish Journal of Residential Child Care is a peer-reviewed, open access e-journal which aims to provide a rich forum for debate and dissemination about the topical issues in residential child care research, policy and practice.
The Scottish Government has today (7 September) announced investment of £500m in a new Whole Family Wellbeing Fund. Announcing the funding in the new Programme for Government for 2021-22, the First Minister explained that this funding aims to enable the building of universal, holistic support services, to be available in communities across Scotland, giving families access to the help they need, where and when they need it.
The Civil Service Care Leaver Internship offers care leavers aged 18-30 the opportunity to undertake paid 12-month internships in government departments and agencies throughout the UK. In this blog post, four current interns working in different departments in the Scottish Government discuss the application process, their experiences as interns, and offer advice for potential applicants.
The focus for SIRCC 2021 Online will be on what is needed to support the residential child care workforce as they care for children and young people. Following on from the reports from the Independent Care Review and the setting up of The Promise to facilitate and support change, wherever that change needs to happen, it’s essential that this community of practitioners is in the best place possible to support, develop and love those in their care.
The Scottish Government has published new Learning Review Guidance following a review of its approach to learning from child protection cases. This replaces guidance on conducting Significant Case Reviews published in 2015.
Replacing the National Guidance for Child Protection in Scotland, last published in 2014, this revised guidance describes the responsibilities and expectations of everyone who works with, or comes into contact with, children and young people, families and carers in Scotland.
The Scottish Government has published new National Guidance for Child Protection in Scotland. Replacing the National Guidance for Child Protection in Scotland, last published in 2014, this revised guidance describes the responsibilities and expectations of everyone who works with, or comes into contact with, children and young people, families and carers in Scotland.
The Scottish Government has awarded further funding to CELCIS to invest in the continued development of Scotland’s Virtual School Head Teachers’ Network.
Inclusion, experience and value in participation. In this Network Event, we explore the theme of inclusion, experience and value in participation projects, and how organisations in Scotland use different approaches, depending on the context.
For all of us involved in supporting children and families, the pandemic has shown that building back better from COVID-19 doesn’t mean returning to our previous ways of working; it means resetting them. Now, as I reflect on the last 12 months, it is clear that Scotland is on the path to making the changes and improvements that need to happen – and are already happening – for our children and families.
Alison Cowper, Service Manager with the Independent Care and Review Team (Children and Families) at Glasgow City Health and Social Care Partnership talks about how ‘what does this mean for Fred?’ influenced their work with CELCIS when process mapping their current system.
At our May 2021 Education Forum meeting we were delighted to welcome four Attainment Advisors from Education Scotland who shared information, insights and practical examples of their work as part of the the Scottish Attainment Challenge with a focus on improving attainment for care experienced children and young people.
A Consultants Working Group was instrumental on helping to shape the content, tone and language of Scotland’s new National Practice Guidance to support the rights of care experienced children and their brothers and sisters in Scotland. Here, one of the consultants Saffron Rohan, discusses the process of contributing to the development of the guidance, and the importance of listening to and embedding lived experience in changes to policy and practice.
Since founding STAR, and in my time as a foster carer, I’ve seen and heard first-hand the impact of one of the most heart-breaking problems of the care system: children being separated from their brothers and sisters, at times in homes that are far away from each other, or being prevented from having a relationship at all.
A kinship carer who has looked after her granddaughter for the past decade shares some of the challenges and the rewards this brings.
This National Practice Guidance for Scotland is designed to contribute to the effective implementation of new legislative changes introduced under the Children (Scotland) Act 2020 to uphold the rights and meet the needs of children with care experience and their families.
The Scottish Government has published new National Practice Guidance, ‘Staying Together and Connected: Getting it Right for Sisters and Brothers’ to support new legislative changes coming into effect today, 26 July.
Aileen Nicol, Head of Improving Protection and Permanence at Celcis, a member of Stand Up For Siblings, has written a blog about the new National Practice Guidance ‘Staying Together and Connected: Getting it right for sisters and brothers’.
As CELCIS, in partnership with Coram Voice, launches the Bright Spots programme pilot in Scotland, this blog post reflects on the experience of one local authority's participation in the programme in England.
This report was prepared by CELCIS in collaboration with local authorities and stakeholders in Scotland to inform the Scottish Government Children and Families Collective Leadership Group's consideration of the impact of COVID-19 on children and families.
This Foundations report from Healthcare Improvement Scotland and Care Inspectorate highlights examples of current practice and models, particular areas of excellence and new research evidence and literature relating to the formation of a Scottish Barnahus (Bairns’ Hoose).
This new factsheet from the Scottish Government sets out a vision for how Barnahus should be implemented in Scotland, the values which should underpin the model and the approach to its practical implementation.
As a leading improvement centre in Scotland, our focus is always: is this in the best interests of children and young people in need of care and protection, their families and carers? It is this question that is driving our analysis and consideration of the proposals in the new National Care Service for Scotland currently out for consultation.
The Scottish Government published new National Guidance for Child Protection in Scotland 2021. Replacing the National Guidance for Child Protection in Scotland, last published in 2014, this revised guidance describes the responsibilities and expectations of everyone who works with, or comes into contact with, children and young people, families and carers in Scotland.
The Scottish Journal of Residential Child Care is a peer-reviewed, open access e-journal which aims to provide a rich forum for debate and dissemination about the topical issues in residential child care research, policy and practice.
The Scottish Government has today (7 September) announced investment of £500m in a new Whole Family Wellbeing Fund. Announcing the funding in the new Programme for Government for 2021-22, the First Minister explained that this funding aims to enable the building of universal, holistic support services, to be available in communities across Scotland, giving families access to the help they need, where and when they need it.
The Civil Service Care Leaver Internship offers care leavers aged 18-30 the opportunity to undertake paid 12-month internships in government departments and agencies throughout the UK. In this blog post, four current interns working in different departments in the Scottish Government discuss the application process, their experiences as interns, and offer advice for potential applicants.
The focus for SIRCC 2021 Online will be on what is needed to support the residential child care workforce as they care for children and young people. Following on from the reports from the Independent Care Review and the setting up of The Promise to facilitate and support change, wherever that change needs to happen, it’s essential that this community of practitioners is in the best place possible to support, develop and love those in their care.
The Scottish Government has published new Learning Review Guidance following a review of its approach to learning from child protection cases. This replaces guidance on conducting Significant Case Reviews published in 2015.
Replacing the National Guidance for Child Protection in Scotland, last published in 2014, this revised guidance describes the responsibilities and expectations of everyone who works with, or comes into contact with, children and young people, families and carers in Scotland.
The Scottish Government has published new National Guidance for Child Protection in Scotland. Replacing the National Guidance for Child Protection in Scotland, last published in 2014, this revised guidance describes the responsibilities and expectations of everyone who works with, or comes into contact with, children and young people, families and carers in Scotland.
The Scottish Government has awarded further funding to CELCIS to invest in the continued development of Scotland’s Virtual School Head Teachers’ Network.
Inclusion, experience and value in participation. In this Network Event, we explore the theme of inclusion, experience and value in participation projects, and how organisations in Scotland use different approaches, depending on the context.
For all of us involved in supporting children and families, the pandemic has shown that building back better from COVID-19 doesn’t mean returning to our previous ways of working; it means resetting them. Now, as I reflect on the last 12 months, it is clear that Scotland is on the path to making the changes and improvements that need to happen – and are already happening – for our children and families.
Alison Cowper, Service Manager with the Independent Care and Review Team (Children and Families) at Glasgow City Health and Social Care Partnership talks about how ‘what does this mean for Fred?’ influenced their work with CELCIS when process mapping their current system.
At our May 2021 Education Forum meeting we were delighted to welcome four Attainment Advisors from Education Scotland who shared information, insights and practical examples of their work as part of the the Scottish Attainment Challenge with a focus on improving attainment for care experienced children and young people.
A Consultants Working Group was instrumental on helping to shape the content, tone and language of Scotland’s new National Practice Guidance to support the rights of care experienced children and their brothers and sisters in Scotland. Here, one of the consultants Saffron Rohan, discusses the process of contributing to the development of the guidance, and the importance of listening to and embedding lived experience in changes to policy and practice.
Since founding STAR, and in my time as a foster carer, I’ve seen and heard first-hand the impact of one of the most heart-breaking problems of the care system: children being separated from their brothers and sisters, at times in homes that are far away from each other, or being prevented from having a relationship at all.
A kinship carer who has looked after her granddaughter for the past decade shares some of the challenges and the rewards this brings.
This National Practice Guidance for Scotland is designed to contribute to the effective implementation of new legislative changes introduced under the Children (Scotland) Act 2020 to uphold the rights and meet the needs of children with care experience and their families.
The Scottish Government has published new National Practice Guidance, ‘Staying Together and Connected: Getting it Right for Sisters and Brothers’ to support new legislative changes coming into effect today, 26 July.
Aileen Nicol, Head of Improving Protection and Permanence at Celcis, a member of Stand Up For Siblings, has written a blog about the new National Practice Guidance ‘Staying Together and Connected: Getting it right for sisters and brothers’.
As CELCIS, in partnership with Coram Voice, launches the Bright Spots programme pilot in Scotland, this blog post reflects on the experience of one local authority's participation in the programme in England.
This report was prepared by CELCIS in collaboration with local authorities and stakeholders in Scotland to inform the Scottish Government Children and Families Collective Leadership Group's consideration of the impact of COVID-19 on children and families.
This Foundations report from Healthcare Improvement Scotland and Care Inspectorate highlights examples of current practice and models, particular areas of excellence and new research evidence and literature relating to the formation of a Scottish Barnahus (Bairns’ Hoose).
This new factsheet from the Scottish Government sets out a vision for how Barnahus should be implemented in Scotland, the values which should underpin the model and the approach to its practical implementation.
As a leading improvement centre in Scotland, our focus is always: is this in the best interests of children and young people in need of care and protection, their families and carers? It is this question that is driving our analysis and consideration of the proposals in the new National Care Service for Scotland currently out for consultation.
The Scottish Government published new National Guidance for Child Protection in Scotland 2021. Replacing the National Guidance for Child Protection in Scotland, last published in 2014, this revised guidance describes the responsibilities and expectations of everyone who works with, or comes into contact with, children and young people, families and carers in Scotland.
The Scottish Journal of Residential Child Care is a peer-reviewed, open access e-journal which aims to provide a rich forum for debate and dissemination about the topical issues in residential child care research, policy and practice.
The Scottish Government has today (7 September) announced investment of £500m in a new Whole Family Wellbeing Fund. Announcing the funding in the new Programme for Government for 2021-22, the First Minister explained that this funding aims to enable the building of universal, holistic support services, to be available in communities across Scotland, giving families access to the help they need, where and when they need it.
The Civil Service Care Leaver Internship offers care leavers aged 18-30 the opportunity to undertake paid 12-month internships in government departments and agencies throughout the UK. In this blog post, four current interns working in different departments in the Scottish Government discuss the application process, their experiences as interns, and offer advice for potential applicants.
The focus for SIRCC 2021 Online will be on what is needed to support the residential child care workforce as they care for children and young people. Following on from the reports from the Independent Care Review and the setting up of The Promise to facilitate and support change, wherever that change needs to happen, it’s essential that this community of practitioners is in the best place possible to support, develop and love those in their care.
The Scottish Government has published new Learning Review Guidance following a review of its approach to learning from child protection cases. This replaces guidance on conducting Significant Case Reviews published in 2015.
Replacing the National Guidance for Child Protection in Scotland, last published in 2014, this revised guidance describes the responsibilities and expectations of everyone who works with, or comes into contact with, children and young people, families and carers in Scotland.
The Scottish Government has published new National Guidance for Child Protection in Scotland. Replacing the National Guidance for Child Protection in Scotland, last published in 2014, this revised guidance describes the responsibilities and expectations of everyone who works with, or comes into contact with, children and young people, families and carers in Scotland.
The Scottish Government has awarded further funding to CELCIS to invest in the continued development of Scotland’s Virtual School Head Teachers’ Network.
Inclusion, experience and value in participation. In this Network Event, we explore the theme of inclusion, experience and value in participation projects, and how organisations in Scotland use different approaches, depending on the context.
For all of us involved in supporting children and families, the pandemic has shown that building back better from COVID-19 doesn’t mean returning to our previous ways of working; it means resetting them. Now, as I reflect on the last 12 months, it is clear that Scotland is on the path to making the changes and improvements that need to happen – and are already happening – for our children and families.
Alison Cowper, Service Manager with the Independent Care and Review Team (Children and Families) at Glasgow City Health and Social Care Partnership talks about how ‘what does this mean for Fred?’ influenced their work with CELCIS when process mapping their current system.
At our May 2021 Education Forum meeting we were delighted to welcome four Attainment Advisors from Education Scotland who shared information, insights and practical examples of their work as part of the the Scottish Attainment Challenge with a focus on improving attainment for care experienced children and young people.
A Consultants Working Group was instrumental on helping to shape the content, tone and language of Scotland’s new National Practice Guidance to support the rights of care experienced children and their brothers and sisters in Scotland. Here, one of the consultants Saffron Rohan, discusses the process of contributing to the development of the guidance, and the importance of listening to and embedding lived experience in changes to policy and practice.
Since founding STAR, and in my time as a foster carer, I’ve seen and heard first-hand the impact of one of the most heart-breaking problems of the care system: children being separated from their brothers and sisters, at times in homes that are far away from each other, or being prevented from having a relationship at all.
A kinship carer who has looked after her granddaughter for the past decade shares some of the challenges and the rewards this brings.
This National Practice Guidance for Scotland is designed to contribute to the effective implementation of new legislative changes introduced under the Children (Scotland) Act 2020 to uphold the rights and meet the needs of children with care experience and their families.
The Scottish Government has published new National Practice Guidance, ‘Staying Together and Connected: Getting it Right for Sisters and Brothers’ to support new legislative changes coming into effect today, 26 July.
Aileen Nicol, Head of Improving Protection and Permanence at Celcis, a member of Stand Up For Siblings, has written a blog about the new National Practice Guidance ‘Staying Together and Connected: Getting it right for sisters and brothers’.
As CELCIS, in partnership with Coram Voice, launches the Bright Spots programme pilot in Scotland, this blog post reflects on the experience of one local authority's participation in the programme in England.
This report was prepared by CELCIS in collaboration with local authorities and stakeholders in Scotland to inform the Scottish Government Children and Families Collective Leadership Group's consideration of the impact of COVID-19 on children and families.